Plains Political Tradition

Essays on South Dakota Political Culture, Volume 2

A continuation in the study of South Dakota's political culture
Plains Political Tradition

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$22.95, Paperback
ISBN: 9780986035586
 

The second volume in the Plains Political Tradition series

Across the country, election-night viewers typically see South Dakota as a “red” state, but is it really that simple? South Dakota’s political landscape is a mix of geographical variations and political subcultures in historical flux. The first volume of The Plains Political Tradition demonstrated this complexity, and this new volume focuses on the unpredictability and the occasional paradox in the state’s political culture.

In these essays selected by editors Jon K. Lauck, John E. Miller, and Donald C. Simmons, Jr., ten historians and political observers unpack the meanings in both modern trends and historical roots. They explore compelling stories of direct democracy, organized labor, West River identity, New Deal planning, Cold War loyalty, bicultural conservatism, and the Christian Left—among other topics. Tracking the shifting dialogues that make the Great Plains unique, the authors take South Dakota further into the growing study of modern political culture.

Contributors:
Thomas Biolsi
Sean J. Flynn
Mark A. Lempke
David Mills Matthew
Pehl Nathan Sanderson
Steven A. Stofferahn
Brad Tennant
Tonnis H. Venhuizen
Robert E. Wright

Rapid City Journal feature for Volume 2.

Praise for volume 1 of Plains Political Tradition:

“Reveals a state that embodies the dual legacies of liberal grassroots activism and political conservatism. . . . This collection of essays honors these political anachronisms and authoritatively meets its goal to, ‘integrate and synthesize this field of study and locate it in the broader context of American history.’”—ForeWord Reviews

“Rewards close reading. . . . All of the essays are thoroughly grounded on robust footnotes which bespeak the solid work done on South Dakota history and politics.”—Nebraska History “Much recommended addition to any politics collection.”—Midwest Book Review